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Wisconsin in
the Civil War

2024 Free Public Lectures at the Cedarburg History Museum

To attend a free lecture, please RSVP to
262-377-5856 or joel@cedarburghm.org

February 24 @ 6 PM 

Bernard Schneider and the Milwaukee Panorama Painters

Given by David Zeh, Lead Museum Assistant at the Pabst Mansion

 

At the time when cycloramas swept the nation, Milwaukee became a hub

for the panoramic artists who created some of the largest paintings the world had ever seen.

These vast panoramic images, coupled with lifelike dioramas,

were called cycloramas which offered audiences immersive experiences that
foreshadowed today’s motion pictures. Subjects of these cycloramas depicted scenes

ranging from Civil War battles to religious narratives. Working with one of these panoramic groups

in Milwaukee was Bernhard Schneider, an artist who later made Cedarburg his home for

many years and whose artwork is in local houses, businesses and museums.

We invite you to learn more about these works and Mr. Schneider.


David Zeh received his Bachelor’s from UW-Oshkosh where he majored in History and

minored in Anthropology. He then received a Master’s Degree at UWM for Public History with a

certificate in Museum Studies. While there, he focused on researching late 19th and

early 20th century American history as well as the Indigenous mounds of the Midwest.

He is currently the lead museum assistant at the Pabst Mansion.

March 9 @ 6 PM 

From the ‘Burg to the Battlefield...and Back.

Cedarburg’s Beckmann Family and the Civil War
Given by Reed Perkins, Jonathan Clark House Historian

 

More than 91,000 Wisconsin men fought for the Union during the Civil War, many of them recent
immigrants from Germany. Hundreds of Ozaukee County men did their part, and many of them saw
some of the fiercest action and harshest deprivations of the war. We’ll get a glimpse of their experiences
by examining the Civil War service of Cedarburg’s extended Beckmann family and a few of their
comrades in the 9th and 26th Wisconsin Infantry regiments.

 

Reed Perkins has been the historian for Mequon’s Jonathan Clark House Museum since it’s inception.
Reed has a passion for history and genealogy, and sharing his findings with others. He is particularly
interested in the details of how our local 19th-century families and communities lived and worked
together, and does his best to bring that history to life at the Clark House and on his blog.

Clark House Historian https://jchmhistorian.com/

April 12 @ 6 PM 

Causes of the Civil War
Given by Brook Brown, retired History teacher

 

A glance at those issues that led to the final decision for states within the United States to secede and go
to war in 1861. Both long-term and immediate causes will be considered.

 

Brook has a BA degree from Marquette University, Master of History from the University of Illinois-
Chicago Circle campus, Education Master from the National Louis University-Evanston, twice Fulbright
Scholar to Europe, US History teacher at Homestead High School for 37 years.

Presently a teacher coach/mentor at Marquette University High School.

April 19 @ 6 PM 

Frederick W. Horn: Cedarburg's Civil War Contrarian
Given by Paul Hayes

 

Frederick Horn of Cedarburg was a prominent figure in the history of Cedarburg, Wisconsin. He was known for his contributions to the community, which included establishing businesses, supporting local infrastructure projects, and participating in civic affairs. Known as the "Sage of Cedarburg", he nominated Stephen Douglass for President at the National Convention. His Wisconsin opponent was Carl Schurz of Milwaukee, known as that "Tremendous Dutchman".

 

Paul's journalism career covered 37 years (1958 -1995), the last 33 for The Milwaukee Journal. From 1987 until retirement in 1995, he wrote for Wisconsin, The Journal's Sunday magazine.  In 1987, he was named a Fellow of the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters. He was a member of the team that produced "Pollution, the Spreading Menace," for which The Journal won the 1967 Pulitzer Prize for public service. Other awards included the Gordon MacQuarrie medal of the Wisconsin Natural Resources Foundation and two Westinghouse Science Writing Awards of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1977 and in 1985. He is co-author with Martha Bergland of "Studying Wisconsin," (Wisconsin Historical Society Press, 2014), the biography of Increase Allen Lapham, Wisconsin's first true scientist and an Academy founder. 

June 1 @ 6pm

None But the Brave: The Medal of Honor
Given by James Heinz

 

The Civil War brought about many changes in American Life, including the establishment of the first
permanent military medal for bravery, the Congressional Medal of Honor. Jim Heinz’s presentation will
cover the establishing of the Medal and it’s first Civil War awards all the way through to the Medal of
today, with an emphasis on Civil War and Illinois recipients. His talk will dispel many of the
misunderstandings about the Medal, including what the word Congressional in it’s title actually means.
James Heinz is a retired police officer from Milwaukee who developed a life long interest in the Civil War
when his family took him down south at the age of 7 in 1964 for the Centennial of the Civil War. He is a
member and former board of directors member of the Civil War Round Table of Milwaukee. He has
presented to the Milwaukee, South Suburban Chicago, and Rock County WI Round Tables, as well as the
Prairieville Irregulars and the Madison WI History Round Table.

June 29 @ 6pm

Wisconsin in the Civil War: The Iron Brigade and Beyond
Given by Patrick Steele, Professor of History at Concordia University-Wisconsin

A discussion on the soldiers from Wisconsin, the units that fought, and those left behind.
Patrick W. Steele is professor of history at Concordia University Wisconsin. He earned his B.A. and M.A.
in history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He attended Marquette University, where he
earned his PhD in Modern American history. The courses that he teaches at CUW include those in Asian
history, the Vietnam War, American history, the Modern Middle East, and the history sports, including
baseball and football.

July 20 @ 6pm

Civil War Currency and Economic Effects

Given by Chris Lese, Social Studies Teacher at Marquette University High School

U.S. Greenbacks replaced the gold standard during the war. Confederate paper dollars were first printed
in 1861 as promissory notes of credit to be paid six months after the war was over. As the Civil War
continued, these became worth less and less. Both paper forms of currency were produced in large
numbers and were exposed to frequent counterfeiting.
Chris Lese is a history teacher at Marquette University High School. He has previous professional
experience in architectural design, public history, cultural resource management, historical preservation,
historical interpretation and historical memory. Chris creates Immersive Student Trips and takes part in
national public speaking opportunities. Special focus in the classroom has revolved around Civil War era
history, African American and Slave history, World History, Unites States History and History of
Innovation and Technology.

July 26 @ 6pm

Old Abe, Wisconsin’s War Eagle
Given by Peter Jacobsohn

Old Abe, a bald eagle, was the mascot of the 8th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War.

He was captured in 1861 from a nest in a pine tree in northern Wisconsin. Old Abe traveled with the
regiment from 1861 to 1864, participating in over 30 battles. He was carried on a special

perch and became a symbol of Wisconsin’s Civil War history.

Power point presentation discussing his life before, during and after the war.
 

Peter H. Jacobsohn, DDS, is retired from the practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and from the
Chair of the Division of Oran and Maxillofacial Surgery of Marquette University School of Dentistry in
Milwaukee, WI. He is a past-president of the American Academy of the History of Dentistry and the Civil
War Round Table of Milwaukee. Currently, he is emeritus curator of the Dental Museum of Marquette
University. He writes and speaks on various topics related to the history of dentistry and medicine as
well as aspects of the Civil War, World War I and II.

August 2 @ 6pm

Aspects of Civil War Medicine
Given by Peter Jacobsohn

Recent studies have shown that more than 750,000 military deaths occurred during the American Civil
War. In addition, 500,000 soldiers suffered permanently-disabling injuries. These numbers surpassed all
other wars involving American soldiers, combined. Discussion and power point presentation of why
there were so many casualties and the status of medicine in America during the Civil War years.

Peter H. Jacobsohn, DDS, is retired from the practice of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and from the
Chair of the Division of Oran and Maxillofacial Surgery of Marquette University School of Dentistry in
Milwaukee, WI. He is a past-president of the American Academy of the History of Dentistry and the Civil
War Round Table of Milwaukee. Currently, he is emeritus curator of the Dental Museum of Marquette
University. He writes and speaks on various topics related to the history of dentistry and medicine as
well as aspects of the Civil War, World War I and II.

September 7 @ 6pm

Cedarburg, Ozaukee County and the 1862 Hysteria
Given by David Zeh, Lead Museum Assistant at the Pabst Mansion

 

David received his Bachelor’s from UW-Oshkosh where he majored in History and

minored in Anthropology. He then received a Master’s Degree at UWM for Public History with a certificate in
Museum Studies. While there, he focused on researching late 19th and early 20th century American
history as well as the Indigenous mounds of the Midwest.

He is currently the lead museum assistant at the Pabst Mansion.

October 18 @ 6pm

Conclusion/Aftermath of the Civil War
Given by Brook Brown, retired History Teacher

After the Civil War the challenge beings. The war ends, what comes next? The plan for Reconstruction
and the results. Often the peace can be harder than the war.

Brook has a BA degree from Marquette University, Master of History form the University of Illinois-
Chicago Circle campus, Education Master from the National Louis University-Evanston, twice Fulbright
Scholar to Europe, US History teacher at Homestead High School for 37 years. Presently a teacher
coach/mentor at Marquette University High School.

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